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Church State Issues

Scottsdale "eruv" or "eruvin" project

May 15, 2014

Jewish Arizona - Local News

Valley Eruv Project starts first phase of construction

Posted: Friday, December 21, 2012 12:00 am
Updated: 10:01 am, Tue Jul 30, 2013.

LEISAH WOLDOFF Managing Editor

The Valley Eruv Project (VEP) has started the initial portion of its construction stage.

VEP, a partnership of rabbis, volunteers and supporters, started planning in 2008 "to design, permit, fund, construct and maintain an eruv for our community," according to Rabbi Ariel Shoshan of Ahavas Torah in Scottsdale.

An eruv allows Sabbath-observant Jews to carry items and push strollers and wheelchairs on Shabbat.

The designs are now complete, permits have been approved and more than $180,000 has been raised (including two $50,000 gifts and a $10,000 grant from the Jewish Community Foundation).

On Dec. 9, Shoshan and Ben Ellis, a VEP committee member, joined Howie Shapiro, former director of the Los Angeles Eruv, and three representatives from JCRA Construction to travel around the eruv's perimeter to visit all locations that involve one or more sunken poles (those that require digging), a process that took nearly eight hours.

They also took "comprehensive looks at what we consider 'high profile' locations ... in order to ensure that our approved designs are aesthetically pleasing, aside from their halachic and engineering integrity," Shoshan wrote in an email to Jewish News.

Once it is complete, the eruv will cover a perimeter of about 40 miles and encompass "a large portion of Jewish communal organizations and countless hotels," Shoshan wrote.

The borders are: Central Arizona Project canal north of Bell Road on the north, the Arizona Canal on the south, State Route 51 on the west and Loop 101 on the east.

Over the next month, the poles and supplies will be fabricated and then the eruv will be constructed over a multiweek period, Shoshan wrote. "We anticipate that it will be functional within the next several months."

For more information about the eruv, call 480-467-4593 or email ashoshan@ahavastorah.org.


Source

Eruv construction begins

LEISAH WOLDOFF Managing Editor

Construction on the Valley Eruv Project (VEP) began at 5 a.m. Tuesday, May 28, and by the end of the day, construction was complete in five locations.

Since the project started in 2008, organizers have worked with officials in Paradise Valley, Phoenix, Scottsdale and the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community, in addition to utility companies and the Arizona Department of Transportation to finalize contracts, insurance, traffic planning and construction permits.

According to an email from VEP, “the Shulchan Aruch/Code of Jewish Law (O.C. 382:1) teaches that an eruv is valid when all of its inhabitants allow one another to carry within its boundaries. In the case of municipal eruvin, this is accomplished when the Jewish community creates an eruv and secures the rights to carry in it by contracting the rights from the governing agency or agencies within the eruv.”

An eruv allows Sabbath-observant Jews to carry items and push strollers and wheelchairs on Shabbat. The VEP borders are: Central Arizona Project canal north of Bell Road on the north, the Arizona Canal on the south, State Route 51 on the west and Loop 101 on the east. Construction of the eruv, which is partially funded by a grant from the Jewish Community Foundation of Greater Phoenix, is scheduled to take several weeks.


Also see:

Phoenix Eruv Project

Scottsdale Eruv Project

Chandler Eruv Project